Leaving a Legacy

What is the definition of “legacy”? According to Merriam-Webster, it is “something that happened in the past or that comes from someone in the past” or “something transmitted by or received from an ancestor or predecessor or from the past”…simple enough.

The missionaries pictured in this post served most of their terms on the field during a time when transportation back to the States wasn’t as readily available as it is today; communications technology wasn’t as advanced as it is now, so email and FaceTime weren’t as easy to access; the AIM planes weren’t flying as often to evacuate sick or hurt missionaries; and many GMI missionaries felt more isolated than the missionary feels today. The sacrifices seemed greater and the separations seemed wider.

Leaving a legacy Chris-with-Jerry-and-Pat-Henshaw-675x385
Chris with Jerry and Pat Henshaw

Pictured above are Jerry and Pat Henshaw with Chris Egemeier, All three served tirelessly in Congo for many years. Chris first went to Congo in 1948 with his wife, Edna Mae, who faithfully served alongside him until she went home to be with the Lord in 1996. They were in Congo for 20 years and Chris worked on Swahili literature following his return to the States. His last trip back to Congo was to the 70th anniversary of Sam Vinton, Sr. which was celebrated in 1998.

Jerry and Pat Henshaw served in Congo alongside Bill and Mary Bunch, Wayne and Phyllis Schoonover, Sam and Becky Vinton, Ernie and Hallie Green, and others doing a variety of ministries at Kama. After returning to the States for many years, Jerry and Pat returned to Congo during their retirement to spend more time serving the Lord in Africa.

Leaving a legacy Liz Muthyala fam
Liz Muthyala and Family

Liz Muthyala served in India for many years, first with her husband, Ted, and then she continued on following his passing. There came a time when India would not allow missionaries into that country so we no longer sent GMI missionaries there. Liz is pictured above with many members of her family (green dress in the left center).

Leaving a legacy Carl Moyer fam
Carl Moyer and Family

Carl Moyer spent his adult life as a missionary in Africa, mostly serving the Lord in Tanzania. He knew from the time he was 10 years old that God had called him to be a missionary to Africa. In light of this, he took many different jobs after school, on Saturdays, and during the summer so he could learn as many trades as possible. This knowledge of God’s call played a big part in every decision he made. With this in mind he prepared for ministry graduating in 1956 and after studying French in Europe, he arrived in Congo in 1958. This is a picture taken with family.

His wife, Joanne, continues under GMI and is involved in several ministries in Tanzania. She teaches seminars and enjoys hospitality. She lives close to her son and his family which is a special blessing for her.

Leaving a legacy Sam Vinton Sr fam
Sam Vinton Sr. and Family

They say Baba Vi (Sam Vinton Sr.) holds the record for being the longest serving Protestant missionary in Africa, but I don’t think he would care about that. He spent his life serving his Lord and Savior in Congo along with his wife, Mama Vi (Marie Vinton). Although she went home to be with the Lord many years before him, he continued his life in the Congo because that was his home he loved and that is where all his friends were.

We have a rich legacy at GMI and there are more people we didn’t mention. We are thankful for our heritage and those individuals who have faithfully gone overseas to share the gospel, train leaders, establish churches, and spread God’s love.

Written by Sharon McGarvey – GMI Office Manager

http://www.gracem.org

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